The Disability Visibility Project

This past July, we celebrated the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. To celebrate this milestone — and to prepare for the ADA’s 25th anniversary in July 2015, the Disability Visability Project wants to hear your story.

In partnership with StoryCorps, the Disability Visibility Project encourages people to record and archive their unique and powerful stories at StoryCorps’ recording studios in Atlanta, Chicago, San Francisco and in StoryCorps’ mobile recording booth that travels from city to city throughout the United States.

StoryCorps’ mission is to provide people of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share and preserve the stories of Americans across the country. Since 2003, StoryCorps has collected and archived more than 50,000 interviews with over 90,000 participants. Each conversation is recorded on a CD to share, and is preserved at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress and shared during weekly broadcasts on NPR. It is one of the largest oral history projects of its kind.

The goal of the Disability Visibility Project is to preserve American disability history, and to make the stories available to everyone. So here’s how it works. Anyone interested in sharing their story can set up an appointment in the StoryCorps booths in San Francisco, Chicago or Atlanta. There is also a MobileBooth that travels across the country throughout the year! StoryCorps interviews are conducted between two people who know and care about each other. A trained facilitator guides the participants through the interview process.

We think this is a great idea, and cannot wait to listen to all the incredible stories that are sure to be a part of this collection. Click here for instructions on how to participate in this project. And be sure to stay tuned into the StoryCorps MobileBooth page to see if they will be coming to a city near you!

We want to hear from you! Are you interested in sharing your story?

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